HOW TO MAKE SURE HALLOWEEN ISN’T SPOOKY FOR YOUR PET

I don’t think we need to go through the obvious issues that can be dangerous for your pets during the Halloween season.  Obvious…don’t let your pets get into the candy.  Obvious… don’t let them hurt themselves on lit candles in the jack-o-lantern.  But there might be some more subtle tips this October you haven’t thought about.

There are so many things happening at this time that can simply stress your pet out.  This can be very stressful for your furry family members that are not used to it.  Even if your pet dog loves kids it is can be too much with the constant ring of the doorbell or knocking, the sheer number of visitors and the weird appearance of their human friends.  Get your pets into a safe room and maybe turn a TV or radio on before the night starts.  If your pet likes their crate this might be your best bet.  Do not leave your pets in the yard to avoid the front door traffic.  There will still be too much activity, not to mention there are many creatures that are nocturnal may be out at night.

I want to remind people that when dogs have stress or anxiety they get diarrhea.  People will often think…they didn’t eat anything out of the ordinary so why does my dog have diarrhea.  They wear their feelings in their stomach and stress is a very common cause of soft poo.

Halloween is second only to 4th of July for the number of pets that are “spooked” and wind up at the shelter.  So, no matter what make sure your pet has ID or is chipped.

Maybe you are not planning to host strangers to your home, but hosting some close friends for a small costume party?  Even if these are people your pet is familiar with costumes can look and smell different and it may catch your fur kids off guard.  Again, it is probably best to let them stay in a safe place.

Like we said…you know your pet can’t eat candy.  But also, be aware of those candy wrappers…the pup will eat those up too.  Foil or cellophane wrappers can cause dangerous obstructions.  The dangerous food you DON’T think about is raisins.  People hand them out as a healthy alternative to candy, but it is equally as dangerous to your pet.

Love to play dress up?  Well you have already read the articles about how your pet may not like dressing up as much as you like seeing them dressed up.  But the risk you probably have not thought about related to this are the “parts” of costumes that can be chewed off and ingested. This is something that ER Vet offices see this time of year.

When you have safely made it to November 1st don’t throw that pumpkin away.  First you should be starting with a whole organic pumpkin.  If you carved it and it sat on the porch it could be growing bacteria so pitch it.  But, if you have a whole pumpkin that is still fresh it can now be yummy post Halloween treats.  Both raw and cooked pumpkin is safe for pets. (If your dog or cat has diabetes or chronic kidney disease, always ask your vet first.)  The pumpkin seeds can be roasted and used as individual treats too!  Pumpkin actually has health benefits for your pet…we wrote about this previously  https://happytailsfromhusse.com/2016/11/02/pumpkin-for-dogs-and-cats-6-reasons-to-give-it-to-your-pet/

The best “present” you can give your pet

My favorite part of everyday is being outdoors walking or hiking with my dogs.  We get to enjoy each other and the beautiful surroundings…literally taking time to smell the flowers.  Something I witness all too often is a pet owner out with their dog walking with their head buried looking at their cell phone.

Really?  You have taken that precious time to walk your dog and you are still connected to your device?  The absolute best “present” you can give your pet is to be PRESENT.  Take time to really connect with them and give them your attention.  They live each day just to be with you, to please you, and to share that connection with you.

You have seen the stats on the how distracting our mobile devices are.  Data shows us that parents of human children will often be distracted by their phones during times that have traditionally been sacred family time.   A couple of eye opening stats from various studies for you:

-More than a third of children (11-18 years old) interviewed asked, would like their parents to stop checking their devices so frequently

-82% of kids interviewed thought that meal time should be device free.  14% of these kids said their parents spent time on their devices during meal time.  95% of those same parents when polled said they did not access their devices during meal time.

Many of us consider our pets our children.  Unfortunately, people have let these devices steal valuable time from these kids too!  If you are a busy parent and you are already trying to make time for your human children, your four-legged children may get pushed even further down the list.  If you are a working person you get maybe 5-6 waking hours at the end of each day to get everything in your home life taken care of and this includes giving true undivided attention to your loved ones.   We try to multi task just about everything in our lives but there are some things that are truly best to do without distractions.   Consider some boundaries that might benefit both of you.

-If you are a pet parent that does make time for a walk everyday…devote that time to your pet.  If you feel like you need to carry your cell phone with you as a safety precaution that is understandable; but leave it in the pocket and give your pup this time as your time together.

-Some people work in their home and think…well I’m home with them all day.  When we work from our home we are very focused on completing our work.  We are on our computers or talking on the phone, we are not generally giving our attention to our pet even if we are there in body.  It is important that you still take a few minutes to truly connect with them.  That might mean taking a 5-10-minute break to sit on the floor and play with the ball or just give your cat or pup belly rubs.

-Do you talk to your pet?  They are listening.  You might think I am just saying this because I am that crazy lady that talks to my own dog….maybe.  But there is some real research that says it matters.  A new study from the University of Sussex found that dogs process speech they recognize in a similar manner to humans, meaning that sounds they recognize are processed in their brain’s left hemisphere, while other sounds or unusual noises are processed in the right hemisphere. Because of the way the brain is “wired”, dogs will move their head to the opposite side of the side that’s doing the processing. Having speech and sound processed differently by the brain’s two hemispheres is very similar to how humans process speech.  According to the university, this means that dogs are paying attention to how we say things, who is talking and what we’re saying.

These simple things are good for you too.  Living in the moment and being present gives your mind and body a break that we all need.

In summary, just remember we have a big world with lots of moving parts that we live in each day.  Your cat or dog’s world is not as big; their life is centered around you and what interaction they get to have with you.  They give us their 100% the instant we ask for it, so it is the least we can do to take a little bit of time that is just for them.

Do you make special time each day for your pet?

 

TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING

Well it’s summer and the two-legged animals are out having fun with their four-legged family members.  In various parts of the country this might mean cooling off by frolicking around the pool, the lake or even the ocean.  If you have played ball with your dog around water, you might know how this game can go on forever…right?  If you keep throwing they will keep diving in and retrieving?

Well there are certain dangers with our pets that while are not common, when they do occur it is often deadly.  Hyponatremia is one of those conditions.  You have probably never heard of it, but it is essentially water intoxication.  We worry so much about keeping ourselves and our pets hydrated in the hot summer months, but this is when you take in TOO MUCH water.  The body of an animal (dog, cat or human) can only process a certain amount of fluid.  When there is more water going into the body than it can process the excessive fluid dilutes the other fluids in the body and this causes a dangerous imbalance.  Sodium is important and when sodium concentration in extracellular fluid drops, the cells start filling with water as the body attempts to balance the sodium levels inside the cells with falling levels outside the cells. This influx of water causes the cells – including those in the brain – to swell.

If these activities are occurring at the beach ingesting too much salt water is also a very serious condition called hypernatremia, which is technically the opposite of hyponatremia and is salt poisoning.  You will see the same quick deterioration and symptoms that dictate getting your pet to the emergency vet, but you need to make the vet aware that they were ingesting salt water.

Knowing how much your pup loves playing be very cautious of any change in behavior.  This condition materializes very quickly and is so dangerous.

Watch for any of these signs:

-loss of coordination

-sudden lethargy

-vomiting

-glassy looking eyes

-pale gums

-excessive slobbering

By the time you see difficulty breathing, collapse or seizure your pet is in serious trouble.  Get your pet to an emergency facility as soon as you see any signs and they can try treating this with (IV) electrolytes, diuretics, and medications to reduce brain swelling. With aggressive veterinary care, some dogs do recover, but tragically this condition often ends in death. 

Prevention is key here.  Just like children; our pets should absolutely be supervised around water. Be very aware of any activity that means your pet is opening their mouth when they are exposed to the water such as fetching a ball or even dogs that play and bite in the sprinklers.  When dogs are jumping in water or water coming out of a sprinkler the water is pressurized and you may not realize the volume of water that they are ingesting.  So, enjoy summer fun but if you are partaking in any of these activities limit the time spent exposing them to water without periods of rest in between.  Their body has got to have time to process the water that is being ingested.

Why Dogs Eat Poop

Have you ever had a dog that ate poop?  Two of my dogs found poop to be quite a delicacy.  It’s a repulsive problem.

Shockingly, 16% of dogs eat their poop regularly, according to a study done at the University of California at Davis.  And it’s a common reason for re-homing or euthanizing a dog.  That’s sad!

What would cause a dog to develop this disgusting habit?

Well, in puppies coprophagia (poop eating) is instinctual.  In older dogs, it’s a health or behavior issue.

A normal puppy will often eat their poop because they’ve learned this behavior from Mom.  To keep her den clean and to protect her babies from predators, Mom eats the poop to get rid of the scent.

A puppy will follow Mom’s lead and learn to eat poop but they’ll usually outgrow the habit.

Sometimes though, the taste of poop can become normal for a puppy because they taste and smell it on their mom’s mouth.  She may regurgitate food that’s mixed with the poop she’s eaten.

Mom also licks the pups tush to stimulate pooping in the first three weeks, which also leaves fecal matter in her mouth.

The puppy becomes used to the scent of poop on Mom’s breath and the taste of poop when the feces mixes with regurgitated food.

This normalization can make breaking the poop eating habit difficult.

While exploring the world, eating poop is normal for a puppy.  But if they are eating a well-balanced healthy diet, they should stop doing this.

Why wouldn’t a puppy outgrow poop eating and why would an older dog suddenly start?

Sometimes poop eating in puppies continues long after it should stop because they think food should be poop flavored from their days with Mom.

But they may also continue to do this for health or behavioral reasons.  In addition, an older dog may suddenly start scavenging for poop.

If your adult dog is eating poop and they’re showing other symptoms like weight loss, lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea or behavioral changes, this could be the sign of a health issue.  Talk to your vet.

Here are the main causes of coprophagia.

Poor digestion – Feeding a diet that’s low in digestible nutrients may cause the food to come out the way it went in.  To your dog, that tastes good.  A problem with the digestive system may also cause the food to come out undigested.

Diseases of the intestinal tract, liver and brain, parasites, malabsorption syndromes, diabetes, Cushing’s, thyroid disease –  Your vet can rule these out.

Drugs – Some medications like steroids can cause your dog to eat poop.

Boredom –  If you leave your dog alone for hours, they may play with and eat their stool.

Stress – A dog that’s crated for long periods or a dog that’s re-homed may eat poop because they are under stress.  Any stressful situation can bring this habit on.

Hunger – Is your dog getting enough to eat during the day?  If they aren’t, anything that seems edible will do as far as your dog is concerned.  If you aren’t sure how much to feed, ask your vet.

A dog can also be hungry if they’re harboring a parasite that’s leaching nutrients from their system.  Your dog will look to supplement their diet any way they can.

Attention Seeking – If you’ve freaked when you’ve seen your dog eat poop, they’ve learned they can get you to react when they do.  Even if they’re getting negative attention, they may continue to eat poop to get a rise out of you.

Alternatively, a dog may eat their poop to get rid of the evidence if you’ve yelled at them for having an accident.

Restrictive confinement – Puppy mill dogs crated all day may eat poop.  In addition, these dogs may lack food, which encourages poop eating.

I rescued a greyhound that was a poop eater.  Long hours crated at the track was probably the cause.

Isolation –  Dogs locked in a basement or garage away from their people may eat poop.

Associating poop with food –  This can happen if you feed your dog too close to where they do their business.

Living with a sick or elderly dog –  A healthy dog may eat the sick dog’s poop to protect the pack from predators… instinct.

If you live in a multi-dog home and one of the dog’s eats the poop of another, it could be a sign that the pooper is sick and not sufficiently digesting their food.  To the poop eater, eating their housemates poop is like scoring another meal.

And finally, some dogs just like to eat poop.

How can you stop this behavior?

From my experience I can tell you it’s difficult to end this behavior if a health problem isn’t the cause.

Start by feeding a high–quality digestible food like HusseThis will ensure your dog’s body is using the protein, vitamins, minerals and other nutrients in their food and not pooping them out.

Assess your dog’s level of exercise, playtime and the attention you give them.  Dogs need those things.  If they’re not getting what they need from you, they’ll let you know.  And they may do that by eating their poop.

You can try additives in the food.  These stool-eating deterrents never worked for my dogs.  And studies show they work in only 2% of cases.  Some say meat tenderizer added to the food makes the poop unpleasant as a snack.

The best advice is to be diligent about picking up your dog’s poop as soon as they go.  And always walk your dog on a leash so they can’t eat another dog’s poop.

There haven’t been many studies of coprophagia even though it’s a common habit.  But the little research that’s been done revealed things about a dog’s preferences.

Interestingly, dogs will rarely eat soft poop or diarrhea.  They like their stool snacks firm.  Most dogs that eat poop want it to be fresh… 1 to 2 days old.  Females are most likely to eat poop and intact males are least likely.

And 85% of poop eaters prefer eating another dog’s poop to their own.

Even if your dog doesn’t eat dog poop, most dogs love cat and horse poop.  So prevent access to this delicacy if you own a cat or your dog is around horses.

Although coprophagia is a difficult behavior to change, you can avoid the problem by cleaning up after your dog and controlling them on a leash when you are away from home.  Much better alternatives to giving your pet up, or worse yet, euthanizing them.

Does your dog eat its poop?  How do you handle the problem?  Share your experience in the comment section at the top of the page.

 

Gastrointestinal Obstructions… They Can Happen Before You Know It

It started with a little throw-up on Monday morning.  By Thursday afternoon, my 1-year-old Golden had a 10-inch incision in her abdomen.

Let me explain. Last Sunday in a moment of inattention, my mischievous little girl Shea ate a 2-inch hole in my living room carpet.

Although this was out of the ordinary, even for her, I wasn’t overly concerned.  She eats a lot of junk, i.e. sticks, tree pods, assorted leaves and other yard debris.  Since I’ve had her, she’s never gotten sick from these antics.

In fact, she’d never even thrown-up in the 10 months we’ve had her.  This seemed different.

By Monday, I knew something was up.  She got sick 4 or 5 times during the day.  But her typical voracious appetite continued, and she was her usual ebullient self.

A change in behavior and appetite are indicators of something serious.  And I saw none of that.

That night she got sick, and the next day she threw up after she ate.  Now her behavior started to change.  She seemed unhappy.  This was Tuesday.

We went to the vet. X-rays showed some gas in her stomach but nothing concerning.  The doc felt she irritated her stomach when she ate the carpet.  “Feed her chicken and rice and call if she doesn’t improve.”

She didn’t improve. By the next afternoon, she seemed worse.  She stopped eating, and she was lethargic… for her.

Back to the vet we went.  The vet would run a barium series, which would detect an obstruction if she had one.

A barium series is a series of x-rays taken over 4 to 8 hours while your dog drinks barium.  The barium appears white on the x-rays.  As it moves through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the vet can see its progress.  If the barium is unable to pass, there’s an obstruction.

Shea wasn’t at the hospital 10 minutes when I got a call that the first x-ray looked a lot different from yesterday.  They hadn’t given her the barium yet, but it was clear there was an obstruction.  The x-ray showed a pronounced build-up of gasses in her GI tract.  She needed surgery.

When all was said and done, she had three obstructions.  The carpet wasn’t the only problem.  A tough string from the carpet backing connected two of the obstructions.  The lower obstruction was trying to pass but the string connecting the two obstructions held it in place.

Here are the contents of Shea’s stomach.   The problematic string is in the center of the photo.

IMG_3188

The vet told me that string could have perforated the intestines and potentially killed her. Thankfully we caught it in time. And she’s doing fine.

Let me share with you some important information about gastrointestinal obstructions.  An obstruction is an emergency that can lead to death if not handled quickly.

Here’s what you need to know.

What is a gastrointestinal obstruction?

A GI obstruction is a blockage in the stomach or intestines that prevents solids or liquids from passing through the GI tract.

It’s a fairly common condition because dogs don’t care what they eat.  Particularly young dogs that are at greatest risk.

Obstructions can happen to cats too.

What are the signs of an obstruction?

Vomiting

Lack of appetite

Weakness

Diarrhea

Weight loss

Dehydration

Bloating

Your dog may not suffer from all of these.  My dog didn’t have diarrhea.  But she also didn’t poop for 4 days.

What causes an obstruction?

Foreign objects like the carpeting Shea ate are not the cause of all obstructions.

A tumor, inflammation of the GI tract, a hernia, intussusception, pyloric stenosis and mesenteric torsion can all cause an obstruction.

Intussusception is when a section of the small intestine slides into the adjoining section. Intestinal parasites can cause intussusception.

Pyloric stenosis is when the opening between the stomach and small intestine narrows.

Mesenteric torsion is a twisting of the intestines around the connective membrane between the intestines and abdominal wall.

How is an obstruction diagnosed?

The vet diagnosed Shea’s obstruction by x-ray but he would have used a barium series if necessary.

Some vets will do an ultrasound or endoscopy.  Endoscopy is a tube inserted down your dog’s throat with a tiny camera at the end.  This allows your vet to see into the GI tract but doesn’t always enable the doc to identify multiple obstructions.

Are there treatment alternatives?

Not many. In the early stages, your vet may hydrate and take a wait and see approach.  Some obstructions pass on their own.

The risk is tissue damage and perforation.  We were fortunate Shea had neither.  But if she did, they might have needed to remove some of her intestines.  Or worse yet that string could have torn through her intestine causing the contents to leak out.  This can cause sepsis and ultimately death.

And because your vet may not know if the object is sharp or long, like Shea’s string, the risk is serious.

After surgery, your dog will need to stay inactive until your vet removes the staples, about 12 to 14 days. That will be harder on you than them if your dog is high-energy like my Shea.  After the first day, she was ready to go… despite the 50 or so staples in her stomach.

You also must monitor vomiting and hydration.  Shea did not continue to throw up once we got her home.  Had she, we would have had to return to the vet for IV hydration.

Your dog will be eating only soft bland food until those staples are out.  Nothing hard in the GI tract, including treats. That’s difficult.

How do you stop this from happening?

Good luck. That’s my great challenge with Shea.  Certainly, she will never be out of her crate without a watchful eye following her in the house until she’s done with this puppy stuff.  But she is a dog, and she needs freedom to run in the yard.

I will follow her around for a while telling her to “leave it” but realistically I know I have little control over what she ingests outside.

My vet told me he has rock-eating dogs that come back every few months for surgery.  That’s heartbreaking.

I think I’ll call my trainer once those staples come out.

Has your dog ever had an obstruction?  What did they eat?  Share your comments at the top.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8 Myths About Spaying and Neutering Your Pet

Pet owners who think they have a legitimate reason for not spaying or neutering their pet will vehemently debate this topic.  But it’s an important part of every pet’s health care.

Spaying is the surgical removal of the ovaries and uterus in a female.  Neutering is removal of the testicles in a male.

And neutering is also the general term used for the procedures in both males and females.

There is no legitimate reason to not neuter your pet.  Unless you are a responsible professional breeder of purebred dogs or cats breeding to maintain the characteristics of the breed, you should spay or neuter your pet.

Both procedures have lifelong health and behavioral benefits.

Spaying helps prevent uterine infections, and cancer of the breast, ovaries and uterus.  These are all usually fatal in dogs and cats.

In fact, when I was a child one of my dogs died suddenly from a uterine infection.  For some reason unknown to me, my parents didn’t spay her.  I would never repeat that mistake with my own dogs.  It was devastating!

In males, neutering prevents testicular cancer.  And those intact males will roam.  They’ll do anything to find a female.  That includes digging under fences and finding escape routes out of your home.  An animal on the loose can be hit by a car or injured in a fight with another male.

People who choose not to neuter their pet have some misconception about what it means to do so.

If one of these 9 myths is stopping you from spaying or neutering your pet, please rethink your position.

Myth 1:  My pet is a purebred and they’re too beautiful not to breed.

1 out of every 4 pets brought to shelters are purebred.  You are adding to the problem of overpopulated shelters if you breed your pet.  Even if you can find homes for the babies in your litter that means fewer homes for the purebreds in the shelter.

Myth 2: My pet will get fat and lazy.

The only reason pets get fat and lazy is because their owners feed them too much and don’t give them enough exercise.

Myth 3: My pet has such a great personality; I must breed them to get a whole litter of puppies or kittens just like my pet.

There’s no guarantee of that.  The best breeders in the world can’t guarantee the personalities of the puppies or kittens in a litter.

Myth 4:  Spaying/neutering is expensive.

This is not true.  Many states and counties have low-cost spay/neuter programs.  Here’s a link to the low-cost spay/neuter finder at the Humane Society of the United States.

The cost of not fixing your pet is likely to be substantially higher.  A litter requires expensive veterinary care and vaccines.

When your intact male gets out of your house and sustains injuries in a fight or run in with a car, the vet bills will be a lot more expensive than the cost of neutering him.

And another added expense is licensing.  Counties charge higher fees to license an intact dog than a dog that’s spayed/neutered.

Myth 5: I want my children to experience the miracle of birth.

This is not a good reason to add to the pet overpopulation problem.  YouTube is a video treasure trove of dogs and cats giving birth.  If you want your kids to experience birth, have at it.

Myth 6: I don’t want my dog to lose his protective personality.

If your dog has a protective personality, he has that trait because of genetics and environment not sex hormones.  He will be just as protective after he’s neutered.

Myth 7:  I don’t want my male dog or cat to feel less male.

This is your worry… not his.  Pets don’t “feel” male.  He will have no emotional reaction to being neutered and it will not change his personality.

Myth 8:  I’ll find good homes for all the puppies or kittens my pet has.

No, it’s likely you won’t.  Even if you do find them homes, you can’t be sure they’re all good homes.  And you have no control over what happens to those animals once they leave your care.  For all you know, they may end up in a shelter.  Or their puppies or kittens might.

There are many more benefits than drawbacks to neutering your pet.  Besides their health and reducing the pet overpopulation problem, your pet will behave better.

Dogs will bark less, mount less and be less dominant.  You can often avoid aggression problems by neutering early.

Cats will mark less, yowl less, and urinate less often if they’re fixed.

But most importantly your beloved pet is likely to live longer.  A 2013 article in USA Today revealed the results of a study that showed neutered male dogs live 18% longer than unneutered males. Spayed females live 23% longer than unspayed females.

And who doesn’t want to give their pet every opportunity to live a longer healthier life?

When you decide to spay or neuter your pet, speak to your vet about the timing.  The common recommendation is between 5 and 9 months. But studies show benefits to waiting until after puberty.

What are your thoughts about neutering your pet?  Share in the comment section at the top of the page.

 

Water Dangers For Dogs

Summer is a favorite time of year for many of us.  And it’s such a wonderful time to enjoy our dogs in active pursuits like hiking, picnicking and swimming.

But as responsible pet owners, we need to know the risks we’re exposing our fur kids to when we embark on these activities.

I’ve written in the last few weeks about keeping our doggies’ paws and skin safe from the hazards of summer.

This week I’ll talk about the water.

I most definitely do not want to deter anyone from swimming with their pooch.  It’s great exercise for your dog… and you.  But it’s important to understand how to keep your dog safe around water.

I’m always amazed how much I learn when I research my blog posts.  And I consider myself a pretty knowledgeable pet owner.

This tells me we probably could all use to educate ourselves more to keep our pets happy and healthy.

Whether you swim with your dog in a pool, the ocean or a lake, there are real dangers out there… some you may never have heard of.

What do you know about water intoxication? 

This is a new one for me… and my pups are water dogs!

Water intoxication, or hyponatremia, is a rare but often fatal condition.  It happens when the dog drinks so much water that their sodium levels get excessively low.

When dogs ingest large amounts of water by lapping or biting at the water while swimming for long periods, they’re in danger of suffering from this condition.

If your dog likes to stay in the lake or pool all day, they’re at risk.  Does your dog dive for a ball or toy at the bottom of a pool over and over again?  They too are consuming large amounts of water.

My dog loves when I throw her ball into the pool over and over again.  And every time she grabs it and swims to the steps with the ball in her mouth, she takes in a ton of water.  She usually comes out choking.  If your dog does too, be aware of how much water they’re consuming.

And how about garden hoses and sprinklers?  Does your dog enjoy catching the water that comes out of them?  This can be dangerous. Because the water is pressurized, your dog is swallowing more water than you think.

No one’s saying you shouldn’t do these things with your dog.  Just be sure not to over due it.

Take frequent short breaks from fetching a toy in the water.  Minimize chasing water from a hose.  Don’t let your dog dive to the bottom of the pool over and over.

And give your dog regular breaks from swimming.

Also watch how much water your dog drinks after exercise.  If they drain a whole bowl, wait a while before filling the bowl again.  Over hydrating can lead to water intoxication as well.

Most dog owners think a lot about dehydration but rarely give thought to the dangers of over hydration.  Now you see how both can be problematic.

Learn the signs of water intoxication and act quicklyto get help.  If your dog has been swimming, playing in the water or drinking large amounts of water, the following signs mean trouble:

Vomiting

Lethargy

Bloating

Glazed eyes

Excessive salivation

Loss of coordination

Difficulty breathing

Seizures

Get to the emergency vet clinic immediately.  This is a condition that progresses very quickly and can reach the point of no return fast.

Any breed or size dog can become a victim of water intoxication.  But small dogs will show signs much faster.

Did you know swimming in the ocean could cause salt poisoning?

This is the opposite of water intoxication.

Hypernatremia is the buildup of too much sodium in the blood stream from drinking salt water.  This causes similar symptoms as hyponatremia and is also life threatening.

Swimming in the ocean is not the only thing to bring this on.  Retrieving—over and over again—an ocean water–soaked tennis ball is another way dogs swallow lots of salt water.

When you’re at the beach, be sure you give your dog lots of breaks from water play.  And offer a lot of fresh water so your dog isn’t tempted to drink the ocean water.

If you’re dog isn’t willing to drink from the water bowl every 15 minutes or so, use a squirt cap and squirt it into their mouth.

How about those jellyfish sunning themselves on the shoreline?

If you like strolling on the beach with your dog, be sure they avoid these guys.  Whether the jellyfish are in the water or on the sand, they’re a potential danger to your dog.

Their tentacles contain a stinging toxin that can cause a reaction anywhere from mild to anaphylactic.  Make sure your dog not only avoids stepping on it, but they don’t eat it.

Even the dried tentacles baking in the sand for hours or days can cause a reaction.

The most toxic of the jellyfish to both humans and dogs is the Portuguese Man O’war.  These suckers can be as big as 12 inches long and 5 inches wide… with tentacles as long as 165 feet!

They are purplish blue and aren’t even considered jellyfish.  But they are jellylike.  Avoid them at all costs.

If a jellyfish stings your dog, remove the tentacle without touching it directly and see your vet immediately.

Beware the blue-green algae!

If you prefer to give your dog the pleasure of a pond instead of the ocean, risks lurk there too.

Blue-green algae can be very harmful.  If your dog swims in it, they may get a rash.  If they drink it, the toxins in the algae can cause damage to their organs.

You should always wash your dog after swimming but particularly if they were swimming in algae-laden water.

These algae live in standing bodies of fresh water or the slightly salty water found in a pond near the ocean.

The smell of the algae will often attract your dog so keep them away if the water has a bluish green tint.

If after a romp in a pond you notice the following, see the vet ASAP:

Vomiting

Diarrhea

Weakness

Difficulty walking

Bloody urine

Giardia, crypto, lepto… oh my!

The standing fresh water in small lakes, ponds and puddles are a breeding ground for all kinds of parasites and bacteria.

Giardia and crypto sporidium are the most common.  They cause gastrointestinal distress.  But most dogs, fortunately, will recover quickly from these parasites.

But leptospirosis, which I wrote about recently, can be deadly if not caught early.

What about swimming in a pool?

My dogs have always loved the pool.  And who could blame them?  When you walk out the door and it’s 115 degrees, the pool is very refreshing.

But I find the chlorine dries out my dog’s skin.  Just as it does mine.  Hose your dog thoroughly after they swim in the pool to get the chlorine off.

The chlorine in pool water isn’t particularly dangerous because it’s highly diluted.  But you wouldn’t want your dog drinking a lot of it.

On the other hand if they get a hold of a chlorine tablet or the liquid form you pour in the pool… that’s trouble.  Luckily, the odor is so unpleasant, it usually keeps them away.

If you’re going to introduce your dog to the pool, be sure they know how to get out.  The biggest pool danger for dogs is drowning.

If they can’t find the exit, or haven’t learned how to negotiate the steps or ladder, they may panic or scramble trying to get out.  This can cause them to tire and drown without help.  Just because paddling is instinctive doesn’t mean a dog won’t panic or get tired.

The body composition of some breeds like bulldogs and greyhounds doesn’t lend itself to swimming.  They will drown.  So know your breed!

If you have a pool but you’re not sure how to acclimate your dog to it, hire a trainer to help you.

For dogs that don’t swim but are interested in the pool, buy a life vest to keep them safe.  But always supervise your dog in the pool—just as you would a child—even if they’re wearing a life vest.  That’s the only way you’ll see if they get into trouble and if they’re consuming too much water.

Floppy-eared dogs run the risk of ear infections.  Be sure to dry the ears after your dog swims to avoid infections.  This can become a chronic problem if your  dog’s a regular swimmer and their ears stay wet.

Maybe you don’t want your dog in the pool.  Or your dog can’t swim.  Consider fencing the pool to keep your pet safe.

But whatever you do… go out and enjoy the weather and the water with your dog.  Just keep a cautious eye on them to be sure they’re not going overboard.

Is your dog a swimmer?  Do you take them to the lake, the beach or the pool?  Share your water experiences in the comment section at the top of the page.