Do you have good Petiquette?

We have talked about dog behavior here before.  What we will be talking about now is DOG OWNER behavior.  A perfectly behaved dog can have an owner that does not follow some basic etiquette that comes with being a respectful pet owner and it really gives dogs a bad reputation.

You would not think you would need to be a “seasoned” dog owner to have common sense.  Yet there are some basic common courtesy type things that many pet owners just do not respect. Let’s talk about a couple:

It is never OK to walk your dog off leash.  The only public area designed for off leash activity is the dog park; otherwise use your private enclosed property.  It is likely not just rude but illegal to do otherwise.  The responses that people think make it OK…”my dog is friendly”, “my dog listens to me”.  Perhaps if these dog owners could understand the number of issues that this can cause to other pet owners as well as their own pet, we can reduce the incidents of this happening.

When other dogs see your dog, especially if your dog is approaching them off leash their behavior can change.  The on-leash dog recognizes they have a restriction and that can give them a feeling of vulnerability.  If another animal (dog or human) presents defensive or fearful energy your own dogs’ behavior can also change, it is an instinct.  So, the norm for behavior is thrown out the window and this can cause a dangerous situation for the humans and the dogs.

For a moment consider what other dogs and humans might have experienced in their past.  Dogs that have worked to overcome issues with fear around other dogs can digress from having made progress by having an altercation with an off-leash dog.  These dogs and their owners are entitled to enjoy being out following the rules without the threat of an off-leash dog.  There are many people that have had bad experiences with dogs and are fearful of them.  An off-leash dog can be terrifying for them trying to enjoy a walk as well.

Good Petiquette On-Leash.  Do not assume other people or dogs want to engage with you and your dog.  Always ask a pet owner if they and their pet want to say hello.  If you see an approaching owner and pet that are trying to re-route to avoid engagement try to be accommodating.  When passing by walkers keep your pet on a short enough leash that they do not jump on the passing person…not everybody is a dog person.

Make sure your pet has tags just in case they get out.  A dog getting loose from their owners’ home should be the exception.  Owners need to be responsible for the care of their pets, this includes making sure they are safe and secure even when you are not home.   If you have a gate, make sure it has a lock and is locked when you leave.  If your dog digs under the fence or is a jumper and can jump over the fence YOU NEED TO MITIGATE THIS.  If you are leaving your house to take your dog for a ride in the car, make sure they are secured in the car before you open the garage door.  If you are opening your front door, make sure your dogs are secured or on a leash.  So, let’s assume you have done everything right securing your home and something terrible happens and your pet gets out.  They need to have a quick and easy way for a good Samaritan to get them safely back in your care.  Being able to call you on a cell number listed on their tag is the best way to do this.  It is great to have your dog chipped but please also make sure they have tags.  It will make it that much easier for a stranger to call you instead of animal control. 

Your pet is in danger if it is out too. It could be hit by a car, attacked by a wild animal.  Frankly people will do anything to defend themselves or their pets up to and including macing or shooting your pet if they feel they are in danger.

Let’s Talk Poop.  It is such a common problem…WHY?  I live in a neighborhood that provides poop disposal stations stocked with free poop bags and people still don’t scoop their poop.  This just gives your neighbors a bad taste in their mouth about dogs in general.  The two previous examples of unattended dogs only perpetuate this problem.  I am a crazy dog person and I actually look at poop pick up as an opportunity to see that everything in my pets’ body is working like it should…I know this is not the norm.  The norm is that it is stinky to pick up poop…but come on people just do it.

In a nutshell DOGS ROCK.  Let’s make sure that humans don’t make them look bad.  We get these precious souls in our life and our responsibility is to care for them and keep them safe.

 

Do you have a story about bad Petiquette?

FAT OR FLUFFY?

The exploding number of obese humans in the US is mirrored by the exploding number of obese pets.  We want to show our pets that we love them, but sometimes we are loving them into shorter and less fulfilling lives.  Before we even talk about food and treats let’s establish if our pet is fat or fluffy.  We see photos of clearly overweight animals and think…my pet is not that fat!  So maybe your pet is not obese…but are they overweight?

Dogs and cats with longer hair make it that much harder to detect if your pet is carrying a bit too much weight.  It can be a slight difference and in smaller pets it can be something as small as a pound.  What should you look for?  Here is a transition of a dog or cat from underweight to overweight.

If your pet is furry then I would suggest you go by feel.  If you feel your pet’s mid-section softly you should be able to feel their rib cage without fat covering them.  Their ribs should feel like the back of your hand.  Your pet should have visible a waist (which is most easily judged from looking down over them).

fitorfat (002)

 

This can be a delicate subject.  In general people do tend to over feed their pets and it is more common than not that pets are slightly over-weight.  Did you know that a pet that maintains a healthy weight averages 1.8 years longer life?  The consideration of quality not just quantity of life is important too.  Healthy weight will lower the risk that your dog will have pain in their joints etc., reduce risk of injury, but also research tells us they suffer lower amounts of anxiety and have more general well-being.

OK, so my pet might be a little pudgy…. what next?  Here are some tips to getting your baby in tip top shape:

#1- Portion Size.  This is a more complex question than you might think.  Every food has general feeding instructions for a pet based on weight, but this can vary drastically based on the activity level of your pet and frankly the quality of the food.  Every pet can also have a different metabolism, so one 40-pound dog may need a different portion than another 40-pound dog.  The best thing to do is to start with what the current portion is and reduce it from there.  If you are going to keep the same food start with a 15-20 percent reduction in portion and see if their weight changes in 1-2 weeks.  If you have not seen a difference then you will want to cut their portions by another 10%, until you can find a portion that causes weight loss.  When the ideal weight is reached, increase 5% at a time to determine a portion that maintains their current weight.  The goal is to see a gradual reduction, not a sudden swing.  A 5% change in weight in a two-week period is good progress.  Premium pet foods with higher quality ingredients will tend to have smaller portions prescribed for the pet to receive balanced nutrition.  A high-quality food designed for limiting fat and calorie intake is a great idea.  Choose a food that uses good quality ingredients with high digestibility, so they are getting the most nutrition from their calories and stay satisfied.  A couple excellent choices in the Husse line up for dogs are Optimal Light, Prima Plus or Senior.  For your fat cat try Husse Exclusive Light.

#2- Feeding Schedule.  If you are still free feeding your pet this is a great place to start.  Control the amount of their daily intake at scheduled times throughout the day.  Once you have identified their portion size divide that into at least 2 meals.  If your schedule allows for 3 per day even better.

#3- Reduce/Discontinue Snacks.  Who doesn’t want to show our pet we love them by giving them a treat…right?  Food rewards will only perpetuate their weight problem.  Especially difficult to gauge the calorie consumption for their proportional size are the human foods.   You must realize a 1 oz. cube of cheese given to a 25 lb. dog is the equivalent of a human eating 2 cheeseburgers!  One single potato chip is like us eating an entire chocolate bar.  So even if you have a 25-pound dog on a strict diet of 2/3 cup twice a day, that can all be ruined with an ounce or two of cheese.  If you must give an occasional human treat try a small piece of apple, banana or a bite of carrot.  Remember our pets most valuable reward in the world is our attention.  Reward your pet with love, hugs, kisses and snuggles.  Our undivided attention and praise are just as valuable to them as food.

#4- Increase Activity.  The same principles apply with pet fitness as with humans…increase the burn and reduce the intake.  Adding some exercise will make a huge difference.  Start with a short walk and increase gradually.  Maybe your schedule does not allow long walks.  Get a ball and have your pet chase the ball even if it is while you sit on the couch watching TV.  Also practice obedience, the mental exercise can provide increased calorie burn.

Be strong for your loved one.  They may act like they are starving all the time, begging etc.  Their stomach will begin to adjust to their new plan.  Once you see them in ideal physical condition you will realize what a great thing you have done for them.  Let your pet be their best…. overweight pets really are not to blame for their condition, we are the hand that feeds them and exercise them.  It is worth repeating- maintaining a healthy weight will prolong their life and will reduce their likelihood of painful injury.

Always review your pet’s fitness plan with their vet.

HOW TO MAKE SURE HALLOWEEN ISN’T SPOOKY FOR YOUR PET

I don’t think we need to go through the obvious issues that can be dangerous for your pets during the Halloween season.  Obvious…don’t let your pets get into the candy.  Obvious… don’t let them hurt themselves on lit candles in the jack-o-lantern.  But there might be some more subtle tips this October you haven’t thought about.

There are so many things happening at this time that can simply stress your pet out.  This can be very stressful for your furry family members that are not used to it.  Even if your pet dog loves kids it is can be too much with the constant ring of the doorbell or knocking, the sheer number of visitors and the weird appearance of their human friends.  Get your pets into a safe room and maybe turn a TV or radio on before the night starts.  If your pet likes their crate this might be your best bet.  Do not leave your pets in the yard to avoid the front door traffic.  There will still be too much activity, not to mention there are many creatures that are nocturnal may be out at night.

I want to remind people that when dogs have stress or anxiety they get diarrhea.  People will often think…they didn’t eat anything out of the ordinary so why does my dog have diarrhea.  They wear their feelings in their stomach and stress is a very common cause of soft poo.

Halloween is second only to 4th of July for the number of pets that are “spooked” and wind up at the shelter.  So, no matter what make sure your pet has ID or is chipped.

Maybe you are not planning to host strangers to your home, but hosting some close friends for a small costume party?  Even if these are people your pet is familiar with costumes can look and smell different and it may catch your fur kids off guard.  Again, it is probably best to let them stay in a safe place.

Like we said…you know your pet can’t eat candy.  But also, be aware of those candy wrappers…the pup will eat those up too.  Foil or cellophane wrappers can cause dangerous obstructions.  The dangerous food you DON’T think about is raisins.  People hand them out as a healthy alternative to candy, but it is equally as dangerous to your pet.

Love to play dress up?  Well you have already read the articles about how your pet may not like dressing up as much as you like seeing them dressed up.  But the risk you probably have not thought about related to this are the “parts” of costumes that can be chewed off and ingested. This is something that ER Vet offices see this time of year.

When you have safely made it to November 1st don’t throw that pumpkin away.  First you should be starting with a whole organic pumpkin.  If you carved it and it sat on the porch it could be growing bacteria so pitch it.  But, if you have a whole pumpkin that is still fresh it can now be yummy post Halloween treats.  Both raw and cooked pumpkin is safe for pets. (If your dog or cat has diabetes or chronic kidney disease, always ask your vet first.)  The pumpkin seeds can be roasted and used as individual treats too!  Pumpkin actually has health benefits for your pet…we wrote about this previously  https://happytailsfromhusse.com/2016/11/02/pumpkin-for-dogs-and-cats-6-reasons-to-give-it-to-your-pet/

The best “present” you can give your pet

My favorite part of everyday is being outdoors walking or hiking with my dogs.  We get to enjoy each other and the beautiful surroundings…literally taking time to smell the flowers.  Something I witness all too often is a pet owner out with their dog walking with their head buried looking at their cell phone.

Really?  You have taken that precious time to walk your dog and you are still connected to your device?  The absolute best “present” you can give your pet is to be PRESENT.  Take time to really connect with them and give them your attention.  They live each day just to be with you, to please you, and to share that connection with you.

You have seen the stats on the how distracting our mobile devices are.  Data shows us that parents of human children will often be distracted by their phones during times that have traditionally been sacred family time.   A couple of eye opening stats from various studies for you:

-More than a third of children (11-18 years old) interviewed asked, would like their parents to stop checking their devices so frequently

-82% of kids interviewed thought that meal time should be device free.  14% of these kids said their parents spent time on their devices during meal time.  95% of those same parents when polled said they did not access their devices during meal time.

Many of us consider our pets our children.  Unfortunately, people have let these devices steal valuable time from these kids too!  If you are a busy parent and you are already trying to make time for your human children, your four-legged children may get pushed even further down the list.  If you are a working person you get maybe 5-6 waking hours at the end of each day to get everything in your home life taken care of and this includes giving true undivided attention to your loved ones.   We try to multi task just about everything in our lives but there are some things that are truly best to do without distractions.   Consider some boundaries that might benefit both of you.

-If you are a pet parent that does make time for a walk everyday…devote that time to your pet.  If you feel like you need to carry your cell phone with you as a safety precaution that is understandable; but leave it in the pocket and give your pup this time as your time together.

-Some people work in their home and think…well I’m home with them all day.  When we work from our home we are very focused on completing our work.  We are on our computers or talking on the phone, we are not generally giving our attention to our pet even if we are there in body.  It is important that you still take a few minutes to truly connect with them.  That might mean taking a 5-10-minute break to sit on the floor and play with the ball or just give your cat or pup belly rubs.

-Do you talk to your pet?  They are listening.  You might think I am just saying this because I am that crazy lady that talks to my own dog….maybe.  But there is some real research that says it matters.  A new study from the University of Sussex found that dogs process speech they recognize in a similar manner to humans, meaning that sounds they recognize are processed in their brain’s left hemisphere, while other sounds or unusual noises are processed in the right hemisphere. Because of the way the brain is “wired”, dogs will move their head to the opposite side of the side that’s doing the processing. Having speech and sound processed differently by the brain’s two hemispheres is very similar to how humans process speech.  According to the university, this means that dogs are paying attention to how we say things, who is talking and what we’re saying.

These simple things are good for you too.  Living in the moment and being present gives your mind and body a break that we all need.

In summary, just remember we have a big world with lots of moving parts that we live in each day.  Your cat or dog’s world is not as big; their life is centered around you and what interaction they get to have with you.  They give us their 100% the instant we ask for it, so it is the least we can do to take a little bit of time that is just for them.

Do you make special time each day for your pet?

 

TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING

Well it’s summer and the two-legged animals are out having fun with their four-legged family members.  In various parts of the country this might mean cooling off by frolicking around the pool, the lake or even the ocean.  If you have played ball with your dog around water, you might know how this game can go on forever…right?  If you keep throwing they will keep diving in and retrieving?

Well there are certain dangers with our pets that while are not common, when they do occur it is often deadly.  Hyponatremia is one of those conditions.  You have probably never heard of it, but it is essentially water intoxication.  We worry so much about keeping ourselves and our pets hydrated in the hot summer months, but this is when you take in TOO MUCH water.  The body of an animal (dog, cat or human) can only process a certain amount of fluid.  When there is more water going into the body than it can process the excessive fluid dilutes the other fluids in the body and this causes a dangerous imbalance.  Sodium is important and when sodium concentration in extracellular fluid drops, the cells start filling with water as the body attempts to balance the sodium levels inside the cells with falling levels outside the cells. This influx of water causes the cells – including those in the brain – to swell.

If these activities are occurring at the beach ingesting too much salt water is also a very serious condition called hypernatremia, which is technically the opposite of hyponatremia and is salt poisoning.  You will see the same quick deterioration and symptoms that dictate getting your pet to the emergency vet, but you need to make the vet aware that they were ingesting salt water.

Knowing how much your pup loves playing be very cautious of any change in behavior.  This condition materializes very quickly and is so dangerous.

Watch for any of these signs:

-loss of coordination

-sudden lethargy

-vomiting

-glassy looking eyes

-pale gums

-excessive slobbering

By the time you see difficulty breathing, collapse or seizure your pet is in serious trouble.  Get your pet to an emergency facility as soon as you see any signs and they can try treating this with (IV) electrolytes, diuretics, and medications to reduce brain swelling. With aggressive veterinary care, some dogs do recover, but tragically this condition often ends in death. 

Prevention is key here.  Just like children; our pets should absolutely be supervised around water. Be very aware of any activity that means your pet is opening their mouth when they are exposed to the water such as fetching a ball or even dogs that play and bite in the sprinklers.  When dogs are jumping in water or water coming out of a sprinkler the water is pressurized and you may not realize the volume of water that they are ingesting.  So, enjoy summer fun but if you are partaking in any of these activities limit the time spent exposing them to water without periods of rest in between.  Their body has got to have time to process the water that is being ingested.

Ingredient Source…is it important?

This is a very broad question.   It seems like there are more things to think about when you are shopping for the best pet food these days.  Everybody tries to pay close attention to the ingredients on their pet food bag.  People have been trained to compare the percentage of protein and fat, they wonder is it supposed to be “whole chicken” or “chicken meal”.  Should it be grain free, gluten free…vegetarian?  If you as a consumer have to worry about where those ingredients come from that is another layer of complexity.

The source of the ingredients in your pet’s food can be important in some cases.  Let’s look at the main ingredient groups:

Vegetables, grains and fruits:  There is a marked divide between Americans and Europeans when it comes to the cultivation and regulation of genetically modified (GM) foods? In general, American farmers are more reliant on herbicides than Europeans, in part because Americans have moved away from the traditional practice of tilling etc.   But there are other countries (besides the US) where GMO crops are commonly grown, they include Brazil, Canada, South Africa, Australia, Bolivia, Philippines, Spain, Vietnam, Bangladesh, Colombia, Honduras, Chile, Sudan, Slovakia, Costa Rica, China, India, Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, Mexico, Portugal, Czech Republic, Pakistan and Myanmar.

GMO map

If GMO free is important to you identifying the source may be important you.  Ingredients sourced from countries that commonly use GMO’s doesn’t mean it will be genetically modified, but it certainly means you need to ask.  Need to learn more about GMO’s? Take a look back at our article on this subject in November of 2015.

Proteins: Animal based protein is what you will most commonly find in pet food.  A vegetarian diet is not recommended for cats and dogs.  So regardless of what protein source you choose…chicken, lamb or salmon.  These days maybe even exotic protein source such as kangaroo or alligator!  The question is should you wonder where your kangaroo comes from?  The goal is to choose the highest quality ingredient possible, regardless of which protein you feed.  These considerations about protein are important regardless of the type of pet food you choose.  Meaning there are good and inferior quality proteins whether you are feeding raw vs kibble or whole protein vs meal.  While learning the source alone will not tell you this; it might give you an indication as to how important quality is to the producer.  A couple of basic questions that might give you insight to protein quality are ash percentage and digestibility.  Normal ash ranges are generally between 5%-12%.  Elevated levels of ash can be an indicator that there was more bone contained in the protein source.  A low digestibility percentage can be another red flag that poor quality proteins were used.  Assuming you feel good about the quality of the protein further knowledge of the source can be important for other reasons such as the presence of disease in certain animals around the world.  For instance, bovine animal sources should be free from scrapie (an illness similar to mad cow disease).   So, if you were feeding a lamb-based product this map would give you an idea of the best sources to avoid diseased animals.

scrapie map

Another sourcing issue important to some people is “Ethical Sourcing”.  This term relates less to the quality of the ingredients.  This term lets you know products are obtained in a responsible and sustainable way, that the workers involved in making them are safe and treated fairly and that environmental and social impacts are taken into consideration during the sourcing process.  This is something you as a consumer looks for if you care about the planet and the conditions of the people working in it.

Now that you have this additional information to consider you might be looking on that dog food bag to find this information.  The FDA is responsible for ensuring that pet foods are properly identified on their packaging, have a net quantity statement, have the name and address of the manufacturer or distributor, and have ingredients listed from heaviest total weight to lightest.  Additionally, states may outline their own labeling requirements based on the recommendations of the AAFCO. These regulations govern the product name, the guaranteed analysis, nutritional adequacy statement, feeding directions, and calorie statements. Obviously, these requirements leave an awful lot of the details out.  If you want any detail about your pet food that you cannot find out on the label or on the manufacturers web site email them and ask.  Generally, they will provide sourcing information and digestibility percentages (if they have done trials).

Is sourcing important to you?

Should my dog be eating senior food?

April 18, 2018

This is a question people ask frequently.  People with small dogs generally think about it later but people who own large breeds may think about it sooner.  But what is the right age?

In some ways age really is just a number.  There is absolutely no cut and dried answer.  I think the better question is, what are a couple nutritional factors that you might find in a senior formula food?

  • Senior formula food will usually be lower in fat content. Most animals see a slow in their metabolism or may have a lower activity level and it gets tougher to keep extra weight off.
  • A premium producer will probably add high quality glucosamine and chondroitin to keep aging joints healthy. If you have a large breed your normal adult food may already have an adequate dosage added in your food.
  • Did you know pet food has salt? A senior formula will have a lower amount of sodium to avoid hypertension.
  • Added Nutraceuticals such as stabilized Vitamin C and Taurine. These are strong anti-oxidants to preserve healthy cells and provide good cardiac health.
  • Added Seaweed and fibers to promote lower tartar and healthy teeth.
  • Balanced Calcium and Phosphorus for healthy bones.
  • Provide a good fiber source for healthy digestion.

So, if you are reading through this list and thinking; ”those things sound like healthy things for just about any dog” … You are not necessarily wrong.  Not all older dogs eat senior food, and some younger dogs eat senior food.  Let’s talk about some examples of when this might happen.

Some examples of when to consider a senior formula for a younger dog include:

  • A dog with kidney problems needing a lower protein to energy ratio
  • A dog with any type of cardiac disease, regardless of age. Some pet owners will be advised to choose a food with a low sodium level.
  • Dogs with pancreatic problems need to eat a food with a low-fat content. Pancreatitis or other pancreatic disorders can make it difficult for a dog to process fat.
  • Some dogs that do not have a high activity level and are seeking a low-fat option for weight control may choose a food with the attributes of a senior formula. The low-fat content coupled with the likely addition of joint supplements are both positive things for a pet carrying extra weight.

A couple of examples of older dogs that might not have their needs best met by a senior formula include:

  • Dogs with cancer or other chronic illness that make it a struggle to keep weight on might prompt looking for a more robust recipe.
  • An active pet needing more energy content.

The easy answer…. ASK AN EXPERT.  You can’t just go by the name or even the label if you want to know to everything. Therefore, it is important to work with a pet nutrition expert to match the nutrition to the needs of your pet.  A pet food expert understands how these ingredients react in the body of an animal and under what circumstances they will benefit an individual pet.

When did you make the transition?